BOSSES MAY BE BREAKING LAW BY SNOOPING ON FACEBOOK – DONEGAL EXPERT

first_imgJames Arnold Head of EVBI in LetterkennyIrish company bosses may be breaching the Data Protection Act by checking out applicant’s social media pages, a Co Donegal expert has warned.Employment Vetting Bureau of Ireland boss James Arnold says there is a major difference between personal and professional browsing of people on-line.The practise of employers checking out the Facebook and Twitter accounts of potential employees to see their likes and pastimes is widespread. But Letterkenny-based Arnold warned that employers secretly scanning social media pages and forming negative opinions about new job applicants may be breaching the Data Protection Acts.James who is M.D. of EVBI says ‘The problem is quite serious because of two issues – consent and relevance. For what is publicly viewable to an employer in Social Media may not in fact be be useable by an employer to make judgement without the knowledge and consent of the applicant. And what an employer may view may not at all be true.“To form an opinion based on what is seen could be detrimental to a job applicant. An employer’s judgement on a very innocent but inappropriate comment or photo for example, or on what the applicant likes or dislikes can cause an employer to judge the applicant and an applicant’s social life being the conduit for such decision. They may lose out quite unfairly.’He explained that the practise is widespread and in his opinion, sneaky. The applicant is unaware of what is being researched and any opinion being formed if bad, may not be relevant to the employment on offer.Such intrusions can be detrimental to an applicant are conducted without the specific written consent of the applicant, he said.It is estimated that up to 70 % of employers around the world are scanning social media pages without an applicant’s permission to assist their pre-employment screening methods.But unlike many other countries, Ireland’s Data Protection laws have been tightened up since 2014 and those practising what applicants call ‘Snoopy Bosses’ in Ireland may find themselves in serious hot water in the future.Mr Arnold added ‘The need for background verifications is essential for any employer but they have to be done the right way and the background checks must be relevant to the specific employment. “Media/Social Media screening was hardly heard of until 2001 and has been growing exponentially by the massive rise in the use of social media by private users of such media. Besides, the problem is not just about new job applicants but about existing employees earmarked for promotion.“It is perhaps time for employers engaging in such activities to ask themselves if what they are doing is truly ethical. Does it embrace the core values of their organisation?“The Irish Data Protection Commissioner is very tough on compliance and is observing very closely what is going on around employment issues.’EVBI is the Employment Vetting Bureau of Ireland based in Co. Donegal. It conducts independent pre-employment checks and security clearance services for new job applicants on behalf of employers all over Ireland.James who is M.D. of EVBI says ‘The problem is quite serious because of two issues – consent and relevance. For what is publicly viewable to an employer in Social Media may not in fact be be useable by an employer to make judgement without the knowledge and consent of the applicant. And what an employer may view may not at all be true.“To form an opinion based on what is seen could be detrimental to a job applicant. An employer’s judgement on a very innocent but inappropriate comment or photo for example, or on what the applicant likes or dislikes can cause an employer to judge the applicant and an applicant’s social life being the conduit for such decision. They may lose out quite unfairly.’He explained that the practise is widespread and in his opinion, sneaky.The applicant is unaware of what is being researched and any opinion being formed if bad, may not be relevant to the employment on offer.Such intrusions can be detrimental to an applicant are conducted without the specific written consent of the applicant, he said.It is estimated that up to 70 % of employers around the world are scanning social media pages without an applicant’s permission to assist their pre-employment screening methods.But unlike many other countries, Ireland’s Data Protection laws have been tightened up since 2014 and those practising what applicants call ‘Snoopy Bosses’ in Ireland may find themselves in serious hot water in the future.Mr Arnold added ‘The need for background verifications is essential for any employer but they have to be done the right way and the background checks must be relevant to the specific employment.“Media/Social Media screening was hardly heard of until 2001 and has been growing exponentially by the massive rise in the use of social media by private users of such media. Besides, the problem is not just about new job applicants but about existing employees earmarked for promotion.“It is perhaps time for employers engaging in such activities to ask themselves if what they are doing is truly ethical. Does it embrace the core values of their organisation?“The Irish Data Protection Commissioner is very tough on compliance and is observing very closely what is going on around employment issues.’EVBI is just one of a number of organisations which helps employers to fully comply with the Acts.EVBI offers an independent pre-employment screening service for new job applicants -a system whereby a job applicant’s approval and written consent is sought and given.’ said James Arnold.EVBI is a registered Data Processor with the Data Protection Commissioner in Ireland.BOSSES MAY BE BREAKING LAW BY SNOOPING ON FACEBOOK – DONEGAL EXPERT was last modified: July 27th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Dublin Ireland—reported by Coleman Bentley for El

first_imgDublin, Ireland—reported by Coleman Bentley for Elite Traveler, the private jet lifestyle magazineRemember being dragged to art museums as a child and being told over and over again to “look not touch?” Well The Merrion, with their playful, art-loving Art Tea afternoons, will give guests a chance to not only view the five-star hotel’s art-collection, but eat it as well.Inspired by great artists and works from around the world, The Merrion’s Art-Tea staff has created eatable versions of beloved classics. Always adding to their collection, the Merrion has recently introduced three new and delicious pieces. The new delicacies, crafted by in-house Executive Chef Ed Cooney and Master Pastry Chef Paul Kelly, are artistic interpretations of Pauline Bewick’s Path Moorea, Mainie Jellett’s Madonna and Child and John Doherty’s The Old Fox.John Doherty’s The Old Fox is transformed into a vibrant green apple macaroon, perfectly matching the color of the painting’s garage door while warding off reckless drivers with a miniature ‘No Parking’ sign. Meanwhile the Tahitian landscape of Path Moorea has been cleverly interpreted into a ‘Chocolate Trinity’ of lime and white chocolate Chantilly, dark chocolate cream and vanilla chocolate cream. The finishing touch? Two mini chocolate palm trees.Finally, Mainie Jellett’s Madonna and Child is characterized by its bright, cubist brushstrokes in blue and orange, which is translated into a passion fruit and orange cheesecake, protected by wafer thin white chocolate panels with striped in the same colors.Now all you have to is pick your favorite…and yes, this time you get to do more than just look.www.merrionhotel.comlast_img read more