USDA plans risk-based meat inspection system

first_imgMar 7, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Federal officials recently proposed a timetable to begin implementing a new meat and poultry inspection system designed to reduce foodborne illnesses by focusing more attention on high-risk facilities and those with poor safety records.The US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has been exploring “risk-based inspection” since 2000. On Feb 22, Richard Raymond, USDA undersecretary for food safety, proposed to implement the new inspection system in April at 30 locations, and possibly to expand it to 150 locations by the end of 2007, according to an FSIS press release.The proposed system is seen as the biggest change in the USDA’s food inspection program since 1996, when the Hazard Analysis and Critical Point Systems (HACCP) rule made food processors responsible for systematically assessing, preventing, and controlling food safety hazards.Assessing each facility’s food safety record and the relative risk of what is produced will allow the FSIS to better allocate its inspection resources to the processors that need them most, while continuing daily inspections at all facilities, the FSIS said in the press release. A processor’s food safety performance will be based on information federal inspectors regularly collect at the plants, such as health infractions and microbiologic test results.”To continue to prevent foodborne illness, we have to improve our prevention capabilities, not just respond quickly after an outbreak occurs,” Raymond said in the press release. “What will change is we will no longer be treating every plant like every other plant in terms of its adverse public health potential.”In a separate statement, Raymond asserted that risk-based inspection “will not reduce the number of inspectors nor will it save any money.”He said the FSIS is rolling out the new inspection program gradually so that it can be evaluated and revised as needed before it is expanded nationwide.Industry and consumer groups have expressed concerns about the new approach. The American Meat Institute (AMI) in a Feb 22 statement said it supports the concept of risk-based inspections, but maintained that the USDA is launching the plan prematurely.J. Patrick Boyle, AMI’s president and chief executive officer, said the USDA should slow the process down, seek additional input, and make participation voluntary. “This rush to launch a potentially worthwhile prototype may become a needless public relations and political distraction,” he said.According to documents posted on the FSIS Web site, the agency held a 2-day stakeholder meeting in October 2006 to solicit input on the proposed risk-based inspection policy.The Consumer Federation of America (CFA) sharply criticized the USDA plan in a Feb 22 statement. Although risk-based system for meat inspection is a worthy goal, the USDA has neither “meaningful scientific data” to rank product risk nor an unbiased system for determining facility risk, the group said. The CFA accused the Bush administration of laying the groundwork for cutting meat inspection costs and thereby increasing Americans’ risk of illness and death from foodborne pathogens.Foodborne disease expert Craig Hedberg, PhD, noted that some groups, including the Government Accountability Office (GAO), have advocated a single federal agency to oversee food safety. He told CIDRAP News that the USDA’s move toward a more periodic, risk-based inspection system that puts the food safety burden on producers is similar to the model used by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which oversees produce.”This is probably a necessary condition to change the culture of the USDA toward that of the FDA,” said Hedberg, an associate professor of environmental and occupational health at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. “This is one more attempt to make that happen.”Ideally, meat inspectors at processing plants determine if products are handled properly and then intervene if they need to, Hedberg said. “But it doesn’t actually work out that way,” because, while the physical presence of an inspector should give a certain measure of assurance, foodborne pathogens can’t be seen, touched, or smelled, he said. “You have to have different strategies to deal with that.””Industries need more authority to police their own, and I think that’s a good thing,” Hedberg said.See also:Feb 22 FSIS press releasehttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/NR_022207_01/index.aspFSIS statement on the background of risk-based inspectionhttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/Evolution_of_RBI_022007.pdfConsumer Federation of America statementlast_img read more

Prostitution is not a job. The inside of a woman’s body is not a workplace

first_imgThe Guardian 30 April 2018Family First Comment: Excellent commentary – summed up by the heading!!New Zealand has added ‘sex work’ to its list of skills for migrants, adding to the normalisation of the use of vulnerable women’s bodies.One of the most persuasive myths about prostitution is that it is “the oldest profession”. Feminist abolitionists, who wish to see an end to the sex trade, call it “the oldest oppression” and resist the notion that prostitution is merely “a job like any other”.Now it would appear that the New Zealand immigration service has added “sex work” (as prostitution is increasingly described) to the list of “employment skills” for those wishing to migrate. According to information on Immigration NZ’s (INZ) website, prostitution appears on the “skilled employment” list, but not the “skill shortage” list. My research on the sex trade has taken me to a number of countries around the world, including New Zealand. Its sex trade was decriminalised in 2003, and has since been hailed by pro-prostitution campaigners as the gold standard model in regulating prostitution.The promises from the government – that decriminalisation would result in less violence, regular inspections of brothels and no increase of the sex trade – have not materialised. The opposite has happened. Trafficking of women into New Zealand into legal and illegal brothels is a serious problem, and for every licensed brothel there are, on average, four times the number that operate illegally. Violent attacks on women in the brothels are as common as ever. “The men feel even more entitled when the law tells them it is OK to buy us,” says Sabrinna Valisce, who was prostituted in New Zealand brothels both before and after decriminalisation. Under legalisation, women are still murdered by pimps and punters.When prostituted women become “employees”, and part of the “labour market”, pimps become “managers” and “business entrepreneurs”, and the punters are merely clients. Services helping people to exit are irrelevant because who needs support to get out of a regular job? Effectively, governments wash their hands of women under legalisation because, according to the mantra, “It is better than working at McDonald’s.” As one sex-trade survivor told me, “At least when you work at McDonald’s you’re not the meat.”READ MORE: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/apr/30/new-zealand-sex-work-prostitution-migrants-julie-bindellast_img read more

Tricky test for Ceres-Negros as it battles Vietnamese squad Becamex in away game

first_imgGretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college View comments The Vietnamese Cup champions carry a huge threat going forward in striker Nguyen Anh Duc, who scored against the Philippines in the first leg of the AFF Suzuki Cup semifinals last year at Panaad Stadium.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? THU DAU MOT—Philippine club champion Ceres-Negros faces a tricky away test on Tuesday as it faces Vietnamese powerhouse Becamex Binh Duong in the AFC Cup at Gu Dau Stadium.The Busmen can solidify their hold of top spot in Group G with maximum points against the Vietnamese Cup champions in a showdown set in this fast-rising industrial city north of Saigon.ADVERTISEMENT Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra A brace from winger OJ Porteria propelled the Busmen to a thrilling 3-2 win over Shan United at Panaad Stadium two weeks ago.But while the Ceres attack looked sharper, the Busmen’s defense remained a concern as they struggled to see out the game against the Burmese side, conceding a late goal.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsCeres skipper Martin Steuble expects an improved performance from the Busmen, the Asean zonal champions two years ago.“We analyzed that game (against Shan); we saw our mistakes and coach showed us what we can do better,” said Steuble. “Day in and day out, we have been working hard trying to avoid those mistakes.”center_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award MOST READ Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil LATEST STORIES Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying LA Tenorio set to break Alvin Patrimonio’s PBA record vs Magnolialast_img read more