FDA approves irradiation of iceberg lettuce, spinach

first_img Under the FDA rule, packages of irradiated lettuce and spinach—like other irradiated food products—will have to bear the radura logo and one of two statements: “treated with radiation” or “treated by irradiation.” Aug 21, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today approved the use of irradiation to kill pathogens in fresh spinach and iceberg lettuce, which were linked to Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks that sickened hundreds of people in the fall of 2006. Iceberg lettuce and spinach now join meat, poultry, molluscan shellfish, and dried spices on the list of foods that can be irradiated for safety in the United States, said FDA spokesman Sebastian Cianci. The FDA action does not include other varieties of lettuce. The approval was sought by the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), formerly the National Food Processors Association, Cianci told CIDRAP News. Back in 2000, the group had petitioned for approval of irradiation for a wide range of foods, including raw vegetables and fruits. In December 2007, the GMA asked the FDA for a “partial response” covering just iceberg lettuce and spinach, Cianci said. Prepublication copy of the FDA’s Federal Register announcementhttp://www.fda.gov/OHRMS/DOCKETS/98fr/FDA-1999-F-2405-nfr.pdf See also: He said the FDA previously approved irradiation of lettuce, spinach, and some other commodities to kill insects and reduce spoilage, which involved doses lower than those used to kill microbes. He was unsure about to what extent irradiation has been used to kill insects in produce, if at all. “Irradiation is effective in reducing levels of potentially dangerous pathogens such as Salmonella and E coli and will provide an additional tool that may be helpful to protect the public from microbial hazards,” Cianci said. Jan 12, 2007, CIDRAP News story “FDA finds Taco John’s E coli strain on California farms”center_img According to an Associated Press (AP) report published today, the FDA concluded that this dose of radiation does not sterilize lettuce or spinach but is enough to “dramatically” reduce levels of E coli, Salmonella, and Listeria without impairing the safety or nutritional value of the foods. The intent is to allow irradiation both to eliminate pathogens and to extend shelf life, according to the FDA’s new rule, to be published tomorrow in the Federal Register but posted online today. The rule takes effect tomorrow. “This final rule will permit the irradiation of fresh iceberg lettuce and fresh spinach to a maximum absorbed dose of 4.0 kGy [kiloGray], which is effective in reducing microbial pathogens that have been associated with these crops in the past,” the FDA said in an e-mailed announcement. “This is not to take the place of other controls; it’s an additional pathogen-reduction method,” Cianci said. “This isn’t going to eliminate the need to wash the product. The FDA continues to recommend that consumers thoroughly wash produce uinder running water before they eat it,” said Cianci. “Pre-washed bagged produce can be used without further washing,” but not all bagged produce is pre-washed, he added. The FDA is still pondering allowing the irradiation of other kinds of produce. Cianci couldn’t predict how soon any additional approvals might come. Fresh bagged spinach grown in California was blamed for an E coli outbreak in the early fall of 2006 that involved 204 cases and three deaths. Later that fall, shredded lettuce from Taco John’s restaurants was implicated in two E coli outbreaks, one in Minnesota and Iowa and the other in several northeastern states.last_img read more

British Esports Association publishes esports age guide and benefits document

first_imgThe British Esports Association has published an age guide for esports and a document outlining the benefits of esports.Both documents are to provide education to parents and help break the stigma that arguably continues to surround video gaming and competitive esports in the United Kingdom. The not-for-profit organisation’s first guide looks at a comprehensive number of games and outlines the PEGI rating as well as providing brief comment. For games which do not have a PEGI age rating, British Esports suggests a suitable age. It breaks the world of esports down into different categories, and also includes mobile titles that youngsters may opt to play. It covers games from 3+ all the way up to 18+ FPS titles.In addition, British Esports has designed an infographic showing the benefits of video games and esports. It touches on cognitive and social benefits as well as outlining skills that children can gain from playing video games with others, as part of a balanced and healthy lifestyle. The new resources are available on the British Esports Association website, here.Matt Hancock, Minister for Digital, said: “The video games industry continues to grow as a major economic and cultural force critical to Britain’s prosperity in the twenty-first century. Bringing the thrill of esports into the mix only adds to this fantastic success story. I’m looking forward to seeing the growing UK esports scene flourish as part of this global phenomenon.”British Esports Association chair Andy Payne OBE commented: “The British Esports Association is all about grassroots and strongly believes that starting from the bottom up is key. We want to send a positive message out to parents and the general public that esports has many benefits, and is a positive activity for children when done in moderation.”Esports Insider says: More positive work from the British Esports Association. It’s vitally important for the UK to continue to develop its esports from the grassroots, and that starts with education. As aforementioned, there’s still stigma around video gaming and that’s arguably the reason the UK hasn’t produced the talent of Scandinavia and the likes.last_img read more