Missing person appeal for Pawel Alexsandrzak in Limerick

first_imgTwitter Facebook Email NewsMissing person appeal for Pawel Alexsandrzak in LimerickBy Staff Reporter – July 15, 2019 180 WhatsApp Previous article€7.25 million for patient who was injured on day releaseNext articleTickets go on sale for Limerick v Kilkenny All-Ireland semi final Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.iecenter_img Print Gardaí at Henry Street are appealing to the public for assistance in tracing the whereabouts of Pawel Alexsandrazak, 23 years, who has been missing from the Fairgreen area of Limerick since Thursday 4th July 2019.Pawel was last seen wearing a dark blue jacket, blue tracksuit pants and carrying a black rucksack. He is described as being approximately 5’9 inches in height and is of a thin build, with short brown hair, brown eyes and a tattoo on his right hand.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Gardaí and his family are extremely concerned for his safety.Anyone with information is asked to contact Henry Street Station on 061-212400 or the Garda Confidential Line 1800 666 111.A photograph of Pawel is attached to this press release. Advertisement Linkedinlast_img read more

[NDPS] Mere Deficiencies In Investigation Or Chinks In Prosecution Case Can’t Be Sole Basis For Concluding Bias By Investigating Officer: SC [Read Judgment]

first_imgTop Stories[NDPS] Mere Deficiencies In Investigation Or Chinks In Prosecution Case Can’t Be Sole Basis For Concluding Bias By Investigating Officer: SC [Read Judgment] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK26 Oct 2020 6:09 AMShare This – xMere deficiencies in investigation or chinks in the prosecution case can’t be the sole basis for concluding bias, the Supreme Court has observed while upholding conviction of the accused in an NDPS case.In this case, the accused was acquitted by the Trial Court. The High court, allowed the appeal of the state, and convicted the accused. Before the Apex Court, the contention of…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginMere deficiencies in investigation or chinks in the prosecution case can’t be the sole basis for concluding bias, the Supreme Court has observed while upholding conviction of the accused in an NDPS case.In this case, the accused was acquitted by the Trial Court. The High court, allowed the appeal of the state, and convicted the accused.  Before the Apex Court, the contention of the accused was that the  investigation by the complainant himself would be contrary to the scheme of the NDPS Act, thus jeopardizing the entire trial. The court, taking note of the recent Constitution Bench Judgment in Mukesh Singh vs. State  observed that it is necessary to demonstrate that there has either been actual bias or there is real likelihood of bias, with no sweeping presumption being permissible. It noted that the earlier position of law which allowed the solitary ground of the complainant also being the investigating officer, to become a spring board for an accused to be catapulted to acquittal, has been reversed. The bench comprising Justices NV Ramana, Surya Kant and Hrishikesh Roy said:”Although in some cases, certain actions (or lack thereof) by the Investigating Officer might indicate bias; but mere deficiencies in investigation or chinks in the prosecution case can’t be the sole basis for concluding bias. The appellants have at no stage claimed that there existed any enmity or other motive for the police to falsely implicate them and let the real culprits walk free. Further, such a huge quantity of charas could not have been planted against the appellants by the police on its own”Another contention raised was that about the failure of police to investigate the alternate theory proffered at the stage of Section 313 CrPC. The accused contended that the same has caused serious prejudice to them. It escapes our comprehension how non investigation of a defence theory disclosed only at an advanced stage of trial, could indicate bias on part of the police, the bench said while rejecting this contention.The court also added that non examination of independent witnesses would not ipso facto entitle one to seek acquittal. Another contention of the accused was that the High Court erred in not considering non­compliance with Section 50 of the NDPS Act at the stage of appeal. While dismissing the appeal, the bench observed:”As held in State of Himachal Pradesh v. Pawan Kumar , the safeguards for search of a person would not extend to his bag or other article being carried by them. Given how the narcotics have been discovered from a backpack, as per both the prosecution and defence versions, there arises no need to examine compliance with Section 50 of NDPS Act.”Case: Rajesh Dhiman  vs. State of Himachal Pradesh [CRIMINAL APPEAL NO. 1032 of 2013]Coram: Justices NV Ramana, Surya Kant and Hrishikesh RoyClick here to Read/Download JudgmentRead JudgmentNext Storylast_img read more

A fascination with fixing bodies

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.Joshua Wortzel busied himself in his basement lab as a boy, becoming a kind of scientific matchmaker to a group of mice, breeding them in an effort to alter their fur.He was in the sixth grade and was inspired by a classmate’s experiment that taught mice how to navigate a maze. Wortzel, now a graduating Harvard College senior, recalled that her efforts were cool. But what would be even cooler, he thought, would be mice with “crazy coat colors.” His fuzzy critters ended up with “some really cool coat patterns.”Then some of them escaped.“In retrospect, my mom was completely right in asking me to end the experiment,” he said, “and so I moved to guppies for a couple of years.”Wortzel’s longtime fascination with cell manipulation and genetics — he saved his birthday money over the years to get his DNA sequenced at age 10 — attracted him to the Harvard Stem Cell Institute.“It’s unique. It essentially doesn’t exist anywhere else,” said the Lowell House resident and human developmental and regenerative biology concentrator. “Being able to take classes with these stem cell scientists — needless to say, Harvard is an amazing place.”For the past four years, Wortzel has worked closely on the regenerative side of his concentration exploring how to re-create damaged or diseased tissue. At Harvard, he spent much of his time in the cardioregenerative lab of Professor Richard T. Lee, where he helped to develop a protein to protect cancer patients’ hearts when they are exposed to cardiotoxic chemotherapeutics. His thesis work, which examined the regeneration of blood vessels, has implications for diabetic patients, who often suffer with sores that won’t heal and can face the loss of a limb.“It would be really cool to be able to regenerate blood vessels in the skin for these patients, which would allow us to successfully put new skin grafts on their wounds so they don’t end up with amputations.”A year at the University of Cambridge in England is the next stop for the Pennsylvania native, who, thanks to a Harvard Herchel Smith postgraduate fellowship, will pursue a master’s degree in translational medicine and therapeutics before heading to the Stanford University School of Medicine. His long-term plan is to be “involved in an institute for translational medicine … where you work with basic scientists to help make drugs to regenerate patient tissues.”The far-reaching implications of such work, Wortzel said, might include helping patients to regrow tissues removed due to cancer, assisting a transplant patient’s immune system in accepting a donor organ, or even fighting heart disease.“Twenty-five percent of deaths in the U.S. each year are due to heart muscle cell death, so if there is any way that you could try to regenerate the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart or replace heart tissue itself, you could just help so many people.”Like many undergraduates, Wortzel arrived on campus with a range of other interests, including a love for gardening inherited from his grandfather, and a passion for music and theater, which were passed on to him by his parents.At the Harvard Community Garden, you can see the fruits of his green labors, like the vegetable beds and, in the fall, his famous bearded scarecrow. He is the garden’s “official scarecrow maker.”“There is nothing more wholesome than watering something and having it blossom into something green that gives you oxygen and tastes good. And gardening also allows you to grow closer to other people in the process,” he said.In addition, if you happened to catch this year’s Lowell House opera production of William Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” you would have seen Wortzel in the plum role of Puck.Eventually, Wortzel hopes to combine his passions, bringing new technology to the world, but also bringing theater and song, and maybe even a garden or two, to the hospitals where he will work.“I hope to try to continue,” he said, “to keep a lot of my passions alive.”last_img read more

Murder charge puts man behind bars

first_imgLachica was detained in the lockup facility ofthe Victorias City police station. Police officers served the warrant issued byJudge Dyna Doll Chiongson-Trocio of the Regional Trial Court Branch 40 in SilayCity, Negros Occidental dated Oct. 14, 2013. The court recommended no bail bond for histemporary liberty./PN The 23-year-old resident Jimmy Eva Lachica –who had been hiding from the police for about six years – was caught on thestrength of an arrest warrant around 10:45 a.m. on Sept. 12, a police reportshowed. BACOLOD City – Police arrested a murdersuspect in Barangay 13, Victorias City, Negros Occidental.last_img