CONSUMER ALERT: Double Check Before You Write A Check

first_img Attorney General Curtis Hill warns Hoosiers to be cautious when donating to relief efforts to help those affected by Hurricane Dorian.“Hoosiers are generous people,” Attorney General Hill said. “They need to know about potential scams that could ensnare those trying to help victims of Hurricane Dorian. Don’t let scammers stop you from donating, but be sure to research organizations before giving them money. Double check before you write a check.”Donors should stay vigilant toward possible fraudulent solicitations made via emails or phone calls. They should be on the lookout for unscrupulous individuals posing as charities. Donate on your terms. Don’t feel you have to agree to donate during a telephone solicitation or by responding to an email. You can politely but firmly end a telephone call, or just not respond to an email solicitation, then research the charity before agreeing to donate. Then, if you’re comfortable giving to the charity, you can contact the charity directly to make the donation.  Here are some tips:Search online for the cause you care about — like “hurricane relief” or “homeless kids” — plus phrases like “best charity” or “highly rated charity.” Once you find a specific charity you’re considering giving to, search its name plus “complaint,” “review,” “rating,” or “scam.” If you find red flags, it might be best to find another organization. Before you donate through an online portal that lets you choose from a list of charities, read the article Donating Through an Online Giving Portal, available at FTC.gov/Charity. It explains how these online giving portals work.After you’ve donated, always review your bank account and credit card statements closely to make sure you’re only charged the amount you intended to donate. It’s good practice to keep a record of all donations.As always, consumers who believe they are the victims of scam attempts are asked to report them to the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division by calling 1-800-382-5516 or going online at https://www.in.gov/attorneygeneral/2347.htm and clicking the “File a Complaint” box at the bottom of the page.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare If you’re considering giving to a crowdfunding effort (for example, through GoFundMe) examine the background and expertise of the individual or group raising money and the exact path of the funds. You may be able to instead donate directly to a local organization in the area affected. See what your state’s charity regulator has to say about the charity. In Indiana, it’s the Attorney General’s Office. From another state?  Look it up at nasconet.org.center_img Check out the charity’s website. Does it give information about the programs you want to support, or how it uses donations? How much of your donation will go directly to support the programs you care about? If you can’t find detailed information about a charity’s mission and programs, be suspicious. Use one of these organizations to help you research charities: BBB Wise Giving Alliance, Charity Navigator, CharityWatch, and GuideStar.last_img read more

Dutch Utility Changes the Game by Showing Customers How to Buy Less Power

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享New York Times: When Eneco, a major Dutch utility, tested a promising energy monitor in several dozen homes, things could not have gone much worse. The company making the devices failed to deliver enough of them, and some of those provided did not work.But when Eneco sent workers to recover the monitors, something strange happened — a tenth of customers refused to open their doors. “They wanted to keep it,” said Tako in ’t Veld, a former Eneco executive who now leads the “smart energy” unit at Quby, the company that makes the energy meter. “They were so happy with the energy insight.”The test in 2010 was part of Eneco’s efforts to adapt to upheaval in the energy market. In recent years, large volumes of wind and solar-generated electricity have undermined the economics of traditional power plants and provided the outlines of a future in which conventional power plants no longer supply the bulk of a home’s electricity.Through acquisitions (including of Quby), by nurturing a cluster of start-ups and with other initiatives, Eneco has sought to provide new services to customers — and, in doing so, to enter new sectors, like the charging of electric vehicles and the repair of solar panels. “We said ‘we have to create an increasing customer loyalty by doing something different,’” said Hans Valk, chief executive of Quby and formerly the leader of Eneco’s consumer business. “What we are trying to do is switch from selling a pure commodity to selling energy as a service.”For instance, Eneco owns Jedlix, an electric vehicle charging unit, which has partnerships with Tesla and BMW and allows car owners to recharge their vehicles inexpensively when there are large supplies of renewable energy on the grid. Jedlix sometimes even pays them to do so.Eneco is also starting a business called CrowdNett which, unusually, pays customers for some of their power. Eneco looks for people who already have solar panels at home and tries to sell them a large home battery, like a Tesla Powerwall. Surplus power generated by the solar panels is stored in the battery and Eneco taps into a portion of that storage to help balance the electricity grid. Customers will receive 450 euros, or $530, a year for allowing use of their batteries.Eneco’s leaders concede that they are proceeding more by trial and error than following a grand plan. Still, these efforts may, over time, aid the company’s survival and contribute to creating ways to help consumers shift to cleaner energy.“They are very forward-looking in terms of strategy and mind-set,” said Roberta Bigliani, a vice president at IDC, a market research firm. If Eneco’s experiments flop, though, “they definitely will not be in operation in the future,” she said.So far, the experiment with its wall-mounted energy monitor, known as Toon, has been among its more successful.When Eneco first considered the test, the utility was locked in a profit-zapping battle with competitors, cutting prices for electric power and natural gas while giving customers gifts for signing up. Seeing the danger signs, Eneco’s management decided that a radical change was necessary.The Toon offered Eneco an opportunity to shift course and, despite early teething problems, Eneco expanded the rollout. The meters allow customers to control their domestic heating settings through a smartphone app, and they have displays that show electricity and natural gas consumption in detail, along with other information like weather forecasts.Full Story:  Dutch Utility Bets Its Future on an Unusual Strategy: Selling Less Power Dutch Utility Changes the Game by Showing Customers How to Buy Less Powerlast_img read more