Draymond Green promised a reporter a trip to the NBA Finals. Now the reporter hopes to collect.

first_imgBy Ben Strauss | The Washington PostIt all started innocently enough. Geoffrey Arnold, a sports reporter at the Oregonian newspaper, was milling around the tunnel inside the Moda Center ahead of Game 4 of the Western Conference finals between the Portland Trail Blazers and the Golden State Warriors when none other than Stephen Curry approached.“Can I borrow you?” Curry asked.Arnold, 60, has worked at the Oregonian for 27 years. He started out on high school sports and was once a Blazers beat …last_img

Brazilian claims Quiksilver Pro Durban

first_img28 April 2009Brazilian Jadson Andre seized the 2009 Quiksilver Pro Durban title at Ansteys Beach on Sunday, putting on an amazing display of backhand power surfing to beat Australian ripper Owen Wright in the final.Andre walked away with $20 000 in prize money and 3 500 World Qualifying Series (WQS) ratings points for the win. With a heat score of 18.00 out of a possible 20, the highest score of the entire event, he put his stamp on the event as a deserved winner.In clean four-foot conditions and a pushing tide, the Brazilian goofy-footer was in incredible form, blasting some inverted backhand vertical moves on his way to victory.After two early waves, Andre showed his intentions when he logged a 7.00 to take an early lead. Wright quickly answered back with a 5.00, but as Andre arrived back in the lineup he found himself sitting directly in the path of a heaving right.Near perfectFlying off the bottom, the Brazilian squared up and went vertically up the face to smash a huge re-entry, sending spray flying into the air. Racing down the line, he then backed up his initial cracker with two additional turns to secure a near perfect 9.33 out of a possible 10 and leave Wright needing a combination of scores to take the lead.Not one to lie down, the plucky Australian paddled into a solid left-hander that walled up perfectly for him as he boosted a beautiful aerial move to pick up an 8.33 and close his required score down to 8.10.With just nine minutes to go Wright found a similar looking left and again boosted a huge 360 aerial, but unfortunately he came unstuck on his second move, a vicious forehand layback, and scored only a 6.83.In the 32nd minute of the 35-minute final, Andre put the nail in Wright’s coffin as he paddled into a big left and smashed two powerful forehand turns as the crowd on the beach showed their appreciation. The judges awarded him an 8.67 to effectively end Wright’s hopes of taking home the title.‘Really happy’“I’m really happy to have won this event,” said the elated victor, after spraying the crowd with champagne, “and I’d just like to thank all my friends and everyone who was on the beach today supporting me.“When I was out in the water I just concentrated on surfing as well as I could, and I am really happy to have won such a prestigious event.”Andre’s form throughout the event was excellent and he eliminated a host of big name surfers on his way to the final, among them World Tour stalwart Victor Ribas (Brazil), superbly talented Kirk Flintoff (Australia) and Bluff local Rudy Palmboom.“I’ve had a great time here in Durban,” said runner-up Wright at the prize-giving, “and I’m super stoked to have made the final. This is the second final I’ve surfed against Jadson, so I guess now it’s one-all buddy!”Semi-finalsBoth semi-finals were closely contested affairs, with each of the winners only sneaking through on the siren.In the first semi-final new school standout Julian Wilson took on compatriot Wright. Starting off slowly, Wilson was behind for most of the heat until a huge forehand 360 aerial saw the judges award him an 8.00 to push him into the lead.Needing a low six to take back the lead, Wright found a meaty looking left right on the siren, milking it all the way to the beach where he finished with his own 360 air to post a 6.33 and knock his 21-year-old compatriot out of contention.In the second semi-final, Australian Matt Wilkinson found himself having to contend with an in-form Andre who had put on a phenomenal display of aerial surfing in the quarter finals to eliminate Ireland’s Glenn Hall.Changed tacticsAs the tide pushed in, Andre changed tactics and began using his rail as he carved some beautiful turns. However, he had a terrible start to the heat, breaking his board on his opening wave and losing time as he had to swim in and get a back-up of the beach. Meanwhile, Wilkinson went to work and began to build a lead over the unfortunate Brazilian.Andre fought back hard, but in the dying seconds he found himself in second place and facing elimination.Needing a low score, he paddled into a medium size left-hander and carved it up all the way to the beach, ending in the shore-break before stepping off his board and running on to the sand.When the commentator announced his wave score, a 5.23, enough for him to advance to the final, an elated Andre punched the air with his board.Durban favouriteDurban’ favourite Travis Logie bowed out of contention in the quarter finals of the event as Australian surfers came to the fore and dominated the round. Fresh off a win in the Mark Richards Pro in Newcastle, Australia, Logie went down to Owen Wright and was clearly disappointed at the defeat after showing great form throughout the event.Nevertheless, a fifth-place finish saw the 29-year-old pocket $2 950 in prize money and 2 275 points for his efforts, a substantial boost to his 2009 WQS campaign.In the quarter-finals, despite starting with a classic tube ride, Logie came unstuck on several of his follow-up waves and was unable to answer Wright’s heat score of 15.57.Quiksilver Pro JuniorThe final of the Quiksilver Pro Junior preceded the main event and featured Umhlanga Rocks’ surfer Kyle Lane against Hawaii’s Kiron Jabour.Lane was quickly out of the starting blocks, finding himself in his element in the running four footers to take an early lead.His backhand attack proved too much for the Jabour and when the siren sounded the Hawaiian found himself short of the South African’s 14.83. Lane’s win saw him walk away with $2 500 in prize money.“It’s been a nerve-wracking week waiting to surf the final,” he said after leaving the water, “so I just surfed and trained as much as I could, and I guess it paid off in the end, and I’m really stoked.”The Quiksilver Pro Durban was contested by some of the world’s best surfers and carried the highest possible WQS rating and $145 000 in prize money.RESULTSQuarter-finalsHeat 1:1. Owen Wright (15.57) 2. Travis Logie (12.83) Heat 2:1. Julian Wilson (11.17) 2. Daniel Ross (7.77) Heat 3:1. Jadson Andre (12.84) 2. Glenn Hall (4.56) Heat 4:1. Matt Wilkinson (8.44) 2. Marco Polo (8.40) Semi-finalsHeat 1:1. Owen Wright (12.16) 2. Julian Wilson (11.84) Heat 2:1. Jadson Andre (10.03) 2. Matt Wilkinson (9.16) Final 1. Jadson Andre (18.00) 2. Owen Wright (15.16) SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

21 human rights all South Africans enjoy today

first_imgApartheid laws were designed to segregate South Africa’s population in terms of race. The majority suffered discrimination in terms of education, economic rights, social standing, and eventually even citizenship. Today, the Bill of Rights enshrines many rights denied in the past.The Reservation of Separate Amenities Act of 1953, an apartheid law, specified the use of many basic amenities such as parks, benches and entrances according to race. (Image: Wikipedia)Priya PitamberMost South Africans were denied many basic human rights during the apartheid. As the country celebrates 23 years of democracy, we shine a light on some of the laws that existed back then, and how things have changed today.“The state may not unfairly discriminate directly or indirectly against anyone on one or more grounds, including race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and birth.” – Bill of Rights1. Then: Black Land Act of 1913This law stopped black South Africans from owning or even renting land that was outside the reserves.Now: It was cancelled by section one of the Abolition of Racially Based Land Measures Act No 108 of 1991. This meant that anyone could own or rent any land.2. Then: Electoral Laws Amendment Act of 1940Under this law, only white South Africans over the age of 18 were allowed to vote.Now: Every person who has a valid South African identity book, and is over the age of 18, can register and vote. “Every adult citizen has the right to vote in elections for any legislative body established in terms of the Constitution, and to do so in secret,” reads the Bill of Rights.3. Then: The Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act of 1949When the National Party came into power in South Africa in 1948, it implemented various apartheid laws. This act banned marriage between any white person and a person of another a different racial group.Now: Everyone has the right to marry the person of their choice. The Civil Union Act of 2006 also allows same-sex partners to marry.4. Then: Immorality Amendment Act of 1950This law made it illegal for people from two different race groups to have sex. It also prohibited other acts considered illegal under the Christian government of the time, such as adultery or attempted adultery.Now: All South Africans are free to choose their sexual partners, and the number of partners they have.5. Then: Suppression of Communism Act of 1950This act outlawed the South African Communist Party (SACP) and all communist propaganda. It also authorised the punishment or banning of anyone participating in communist activities.Now: The SACP is part of the Tripartite Alliance with African National Congress (ANC), which rules the country, and the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu).6. Then: The Group Areas Act of 1950This law made residential separation by race group mandatory. The government set up different areas where blacks, coloureds, Indians and whites could live. It led to thousands of people being relocated to designated areas based on race alone.Now: People are free to live where they want to live. “Every citizen has the right to enter, to remain in and to reside anywhere in, the Republic,” states the Bill of Rights.7. Then: The Population Registration Act of 1950This act divided South Africans into different race groups; these groups determined an individual’s economic, social and political rights. It used methods such as the ‘pencil test’ – a pencil was placed in an individual’s hair to determine the kink. If the pencil did not easily fall out, then the individual fell into the black population category.Now: While South Africans are still classified according to race, it is solely the basis for collecting population census information and addressing the inequalities of the past.8. Then: The Bantu Authorities Act of 1951The government set up areas known as homelands for the black population. Each operated independently under a leader, but they were still subordinate to the South African government. A map shows the homelands set up by the apartheid government. (Image: Wikipedia) Now: The homelands are all a part of South Africa, which is a single republic divided into nine provinces.9. Then: Natives (Abolition of Passes and Co-ordination of Documents) Act of 1952Under this act, the old pass book was replaced with a reference book containing a person’s image, place of origin, tax records, employment details, fingerprints and encounters with the police. All black men were required to carry this hated document, colloquially known as a dompas, and failure to produce it when asked by the police was an offence. When the system was extended to black women, they protested by marching from Johannesburg to the Union Buildings in Pretoria, in 1956.Now: There is a standard identity document for all citizens of South Africa.10. Then: Bantu Education Act of 1953Under this education system, black children were taught a different curriculum from white children. The aim was to provide them with skills to work in manual jobs only. “There is no place for the Bantu in the European community above the level of certain forms of labour,” said Dr HF Verwoerd, the prime minister and prime architect of apartheid. “Until now he has been subjected to a school system which drew him away from his own community and misled him by showing him green pastures of European society in which he was not allowed to graze.”Now: All schools fall under a single, national Department of Education. “Everyone has the right to a basic education, including adult basic education,” reads the Bill of Rights.11. Then: Reservation of Separate Amenities Act of 1953This law stated that there should be separate facilities such as toilets, beaches and parks for different race groups. This was indicated by signs seen throughout the country. The act also stated that the quality of the amenities should be different. A sign in Durban, from the apartheid years, indicates the beach is for whites only. (Image: Wikipedia)Now: South Africans are free to use any toilet, or play in any park, or swim at any beach they prefer. “Everyone has the right to freedom of movement,” states the Bill of Rights.12. Then: Natives Resettlement Act of 1954This act allowed the removal of black people from the area next to the magistrate’s court in Johannesburg. It made it legal for the removal of the black population out of Sophiatown, in Johannesburg, to relocate them to Soweto. Sophiatown was renamed Triomf, meaning “triumph” in Afrikaans, after the removal.Now: The suburb was eventually renamed Sophiatown in 2006.13. Then: Natives (Prohibition of Interdicts) Act of 1956This law made it illegal for blacks to apply to courts for protection by means of an interdict, or use the legal system to protest against any apartheid law.Now: All South Africans are able to use the legal system and everyone is equal before the law. The Bill of Rights states: “Everyone has the right to have any dispute that can be resolved by the application of law decided in a fair public hearing before a court or, where appropriate, another independent and impartial tribunal or forum.”14. Then: Riotous Assemblies Act of 1956Gathering in public spaces was illegal if the Minister of the Justice deemed it to be an endangerment to public peace.Now: South Africans can gather en masse, even if they are protesting against government policies, although they do need permission from the police for large gatherings. “Everyone has the right, peacefully and unarmed, to assemble, to demonstrate, to picket and to present petitions,” reads the Bill of Rights.15. Then: Extension of University Education Act of 1959Different tertiary institutions were set up for different races and ethnicities; for example, the University of Fort Hare was set up for isiXhosa speaking people and the University of the North was designated for seSotho and Tswana speaking students.Now: All universities are open to anyone who makes the grade and are able to pay the fees. “Everyone has the right to further education, which the state, through reasonable measures, must make progressively available and accessible,” states the Bill of Rights.16. Then: Unlawful Organisations Act of 1960Organisations that threatened public peace were declared unlawful, which immediately affected the ANC and the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC).Now: Everyone is free to form any organisation because the Bill of Rights ensures “everyone has the right to freedom of association”.17. Then: Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Amendment Act of 1968This law invalidated any marriage that took place outside South Africa between a male citizen and a woman of another race.Now: South Africans can love and marry whomever they choose.18. Then: Bantu Homelands Citizens Act of 1970Black people became citizens of their homelands and were denied the right to South African citizenship.Now: All South Africans enjoy full citizenship of the country. “No citizen may be deprived of citizenship,” states the Bill of Rights.19. Then: Black Laws Amendment Act of 1973This law sped up the process of removing blacks from their places of residence, to a homeland. If they refused to move, they were no longer allowed to appeal the decision.Now: South Africans are free to live anywhere in the country. “No one may be evicted from their home, or have their home demolished, without an order of court made after considering all the relevant circumstances,” reads the Bill of Rights. “No legislation may permit arbitrary evictions.”20. Then: Newspaper and Imprint Registration Act of 1977This meant that newspapers had to be registered and conform to a code of conduct.Now: “Everyone has the right to freedom of expression, which includes freedom of the press and other media,” states the Bill of Rights.21. Then: Internal Security Act of 1979The law allowed the government to declare any organisation illegal and meetings of more than 20 people were illegal unless they had received permission from a magistrate.Now: People are free to form an organisation and meet when needed.Sources: South African History Online and the Constitutional Court websiteWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Indonesia makes 2032 Olympics bid official

first_imgGrace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Tiger Woods, Novak Djokovic, Lindsey Vonn win Laureus World Sports Awards “Indonesia is ready to host the Olympics,” Madang told The Associated Press. “What we need now is support from all the Indonesian people and the international community.”Widodo, who is campaigning for re-election, made a surprise announcement of plans to bid for the 2032 games after the Indonesian cities of Jakarta and Palembang co-hosted the 18th Asian Games in August, and the process has gathered momentum. The Olympics have never been held in Southeast Asia.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesThere were doubts Indonesia could successfully host the Asian Games, an event involving more than 10,000 athletes, but its reasonably smooth execution was praised by the IOC, paving the way for a tilt at even bigger sports events.India is planning to bid for the 2032 games and North and South Korea have confirmed an intention to launch a joint bid. Australia and Russia have also expressed interest. Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games PLAY LIST 01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LATEST STORIES ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Problems with the 2016 Olympics in Brazil, a developing country that like Indonesia suffers endemic corruption, may count against the chances of the Indonesian bid.By some estimates it cost Brazil about $20 billion to host the Olympics, the kind of bill that is likely to raise objections in Indonesia, despite projections it will be among the world’s 10 biggest economies by 2030 with a population nearing 300 million.Tokyo is hosting the 2020 Olympics. Paris and Los Angeles have already been selected to host the following two games, in 2024 and 2028, respectively.___ADVERTISEMENT FILE – Fireworks explode over the Gelora Bung Karno main stadium during the opening ceremony of the 2018 Asian Games in Jakarta on August 18, 2018. (Photo by Arief Bagus / AFP)JAKARTA, Indonesia — Indonesia has officially joined bidding to host the 2032 Olympics following its success staging the Asian Games last year, the deputy chairman of its national Olympic committee said Tuesday, highlighting the rising ambitions of the giant but perennially underperforming Southeast Asian nation.Muddai Madang said letters from President Joko Widodo and the national Olympic committee were delivered to the International Olympic Committee’s president in Lausanne last week by Indonesia’s ambassador to Switzerland.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img View comments US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants MOST READ Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Urgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

Basil Borutski who killed 3 women in the Ottawa Valley to be

first_imgPEMBROKE, Ont. – A 60-year-old man convicted of killing three women during an hour-long rampage in the Ottawa Valley two years ago will be sentenced on Wednesday.Basil Borutski sat in a packed Pembroke, Ont., courtroom and showed no emotion Tuesday as the families of his three victims told of their heartbreak through victim impact statements.Four of the victim impact statements were read by Crown attorney Julie Scott.Borutski was convicted late last month of first-degree murder in the fatal shootings of Anastasia Kuzyk and Nathalie Warmerdam, and of second-degree murder in the strangling of Carol Culleton. All three murders were committed on Sept. 22, 2015, in the space of less than an hour.Life sentences are mandatory on all three counts and the Crown is seeking that Borutski be ineligible for parole for 70 years.Borutski, who is representing himself, refused to make any comments or submissions at the sentencing hearing.Warmerdam’s mother Maz Tracey was blunt about her family’s loss.“There is a huge hole in our lives and our family. Daily we walk under a black cloud,” she said.In a videotaped interview played at trial, Borutski expressed a degree of remorse for his actions, which he said were fuelled by rage at what he considered to be the lies and betrayals of his victims.In the video, he described how he was acting like a “zombie” on the day in question, saying he’d originally planned to take his own life, but decided against it because he believed it was wrong to take an innocent life.“I killed them because they were not innocent,” Borutski said in the video. “They were guilty. I was innocent. I’ve done nothing wrong.”(CFRA, The Canadian Press)last_img read more

Inside the Pentagon Restructuring ahead of Schedule Democrats Criticize Use of DOD

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Many of the organizational changes within DOD stemming from the Feb. 1 split of the undersecretary for acquisition, technology and logistics office into two smaller organizations should be in place by the end of the first quarter of 2019, one year ahead of schedule, Ellen Lord, undersecretary for acquisition and sustainment, told Defense News. “I believe those last critical slots — a lot of [deputy assistant secretary of defense] slots, a few director slots — will all be filled by March of ’19. We’re excited to get going on the work,” Lord said. Under the restructuring, the individual components that now make up the office of the assistant secretary of defense (ASD) for energy, installations and environment will be shifted to a newly created ASD for sustainment. … A group of senior Democrats have asked Defense Secretary Jim Mattis to reject a request from the Department of Homeland Security to allocate $450 million in military construction funds to construct a new border barrier system along a 31-mile section of the Barry M. Goldwater Range in southwest Arizona. “It is utterly irresponsible and appalling that President Trump wants to take away funding for military readiness and infrastructure in order to spend it on his border wall,” Rep. Adam Smith (Wash.), ranking member on House Armed Services, said Thursday in a statement. DOD intends to reinforce an estimated 31 miles of fencing “with an additional 30-foot barrier that includes an all-weather patrol road, and vehicle and pedestrian access gates, enhancements which have proven successful along other parts of the southern border,” a Pentagon spokesman said, reported Stars and Stripes.DoD photo by EJ Hersomlast_img read more

S Bengal districts likely to receive heavy rainfall over weekend

first_imgKolkata: Some of the South Bengal districts may witness heavy rainfall later this week as another low pressure trough will form over north-west Bay of Bengal. The Regional Meteorological Centre at Alipore on Wednesday predicted districts like East Burdwan, West Burdwan, East and West Midnapore, Birbhum and Nadia will receive heavy rainfall along with lightning in some parts later this week. The other South Bengal districts may also witness moderate rainfall. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAccording to the weather office, a low pressure trough is likely to form over north-west Bay-of-Bengal resulting in more rain. There is also prediction of thundershowers in some parts. It may also rain in some of the North Bengal districts from Saturday. Due to the impact of heavy rain, the temperature may drop by a few notches in the city and some South Bengal districts.A senior official of the weather office said that the situation will remain complicated until August 25 due to the formation of a low pressure trough. The condition may improve from the next week, as predicted by the MeT office.It may be mentioned here that heavy rains lashed some of the coastal districts in the state a few days ago. The city and its adjoining areas have been witnessing scattered rainfall for the past few days. A senior weather official said the influence of the low pressure zone, which is likely to become more marked from next Saturday, may bring moderate rainfall in the neighbouring states like Odisha and Jharkhand.last_img read more