Second UNEXMIN underwater mine robot bound for testing at Portuguese uranium mine

first_imgThe pressure hull of the second UNEXMIN UX-1 robot – UX-1b – has recently been produced, with mechanical parts put together and pressure tested, in Finland, as part of the Tampere University of Technology’s (TUT) work. In late February it was on its way to Porto, Portugal, where the technical teams (INESC TEC, UPM, UNIM) will assemble all the components and test the new robot in a pool where both hardware and software will be proved. The aim is to have two operational robots – UX-1a and UX-1b – ready for the field missions at the Urgeiriça uranium mine, in Portugal.UX-1b, the second robot from the multi-robotic platform created within the UNEXMIN project, will be similar to its first counterpart, but with some other specificities. Mainly, differences are on the scientific payload will be seen between the two robots. This will guarantee that different sensors are carried while reducing the size, weight and power demands for individual robots to do the exploration and mapping of the flooded mine environment.The Urgeiriça trials will happen during March and April 2019, 9–10 days in each month. Between the two sets of missions, the robots will be fine-tuned and tested in INESC-TEC’s testing pool in Porto. Here, the autonomy, control, movement and data collection and analysis of the robots will be extensively studied in order to get the most out of the robotic system.The next few weeks will see the birth of a new UX-1 robot that will bring the UNEXMIN platform one step closer to its final state.last_img read more

43yearold bookshop launches its first online store

first_imgIT HAS A dedicated fanbase of readers in Waterford, Kilkenny, Wexford and Kildare, and a 43-year history of brightening up bookshelves.But now The Book Centre has taken the leap online – and wants to provide a personal experience to buyers.The ownersThe shop was opened by Sean Ryan and his wife Maureen, and Denis and Alice Doolin on Michael Street in Waterford City in 1971.The Ryan family has been in business in Waterford since 1749 in milling and in polish manufacturing. Meanwhile, Sean’s father entered the retail business in 1921.Before long they had outgrown the 1,000 square foot store and bought the old art-deco Savoy Cinema in the city centre.This was turned into a premises with a café and was soon joined by a three-storey Wexford location in 1973. This was followed by a Kilkenny Book Centre in 1974.Its most recent store opening was in Naas in 2005, under the brand Barker & Jones.Loyal clientele Source: Patrick BrowneMaeve Ryan, Managing Director of The Book Centre, said this is a new direction for the company “but it is something we have been planning and working on for sometime”.They are conscious of the trend towards e-books, but theirs customer also like getting to spend time browsing books in the store. Because of that, they don’t want the website to be faceless.The same staff that work in the store will be dealing with the online customers, said Maeve. “We are hoping to reach all of Ireland,” she said. “We pride ourselves on our customer service.”Sean Ryan said that it has always been their business philosophy to “concentrate on being the very best in our industry in our store locations”.“We have never wished to have lots and lots of shops, we have always concentrated on opening a store in a new location,” he said.They want to have a loyal clientele, a broad array of products and excellent customer service. This has served us well over the years and we believe that now is the right time for us to enter the online market and again do this really well.The site is available at thebookcentre.ie. Read: 17 Irish independent bookshops you must visit before you die>last_img read more